Abstract

This essay examines visitors' experiences in the antiquity collections of Rome between 1550 and 1600. It argues that access to private collections was not as casual as has previously been thought, but that, in fact, it is possible to identify changes in the reception of visitors in this period as the city's collections became increasingly public and institutionalized. Particular pressures on ecclesiastical collectors and parallels elsewhere in the development of the display of objects can explain the change at Rome: because of the city's centrality, its collections serve as an important case study for a wider phenomenon, the growth of the museum.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1935-0236
Print ISSN
0034-4338
Pages
pp. 397-434
Launched on MUSE
2008-03-27
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.