Abstract

Hugues Salel's translation of the Iliad was intended for noble, warrior readers, a conclusion based largely on internal evidence, both from the physical book (including its woodcuts) and from the French rendering of Homer's epic. This article looks at the book's verbal and visual texts to understand how Salel's translation of the Iliad is shaped in anticipation of its contemporary reception. It examines a translation into the vernacular of one of antiquity's masterpieces, as well as what noble readers knew and wanted to know, and questions the purposes and processes of the production of illustrations and marginalia in the period.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1935-0236
Print ISSN
0034-4338
Pages
pp. 732-767
Launched on MUSE
2008-03-27
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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