Abstract

This article examines Rousseau's Le Lévite d'Ephraïm as it relates to his understanding of the role of violence in nation-building. The apparent justification of violence in Rousseau's reading of this biblical tale points up the obvious contradictions to Rousseau's notion of the morally-justified polity in the Social Contract. In refracting this work through the rubric of strangeness, Rousseau reveals a nuanced approach to the relationship of the stranger to the polis, with multiple implications for our own comprehension of the place of "otherness" in modern democratic theory.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 359-381
Launched on MUSE
2008-03-19
Open Access
No
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