Abstract

This essay considers the literary deployment of antihumanist tropes as these appear in Blanchot's immediate postwar writings. Centering on Blanchot's "Literature and the Right to Death," and his last novel, the 1948 The Most High, it addresses a series of contemporary Hegelian and phenomenological problems, notably the "end of history," embodiment, and the problem of freedom as well as some political problems related to the debate on communist humanism. Paying particular attention to Blanchot's anti-foundationalist literary engagement with atheism and freedom, it interrogates life in a world where humanism never reached the promised secular utopia, but perverted it to the point of absurdity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6598
Print ISSN
0026-7910
Pages
pp. 1050-1078
Launched on MUSE
2008-03-10
Open Access
No
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