Abstract

Visual and oral, video and audio evidence are brought to bear to examine the history of the U.S. census and the practice of social science history. The article explores how artists have appropriated and depicted census taking in America and how census takers used "artistic" forms of evidence to advertise and promote the census and explicate census results to the public. The article also suggests how social science historians have understood and used the new electronic environment of the Internet and the World Wide Web to present their data and findings.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8034
Print ISSN
0145-5532
Pages
pp. 1-18
Launched on MUSE
2008-02-20
Open Access
No
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