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  • Contributors

Maria K. Bachman is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program at Coastal Carolina University. She is co-editor of The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins (2006), Blind Love by Wilkie Collins (2004), and Reality's Dark Light: The Sensational Wilkie Collins (2003). She has also published numerous articles on Samuel Richardson, Benjamin Disraeli, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Charles Dickens, and Wilkie Collins.

Doryjane Birrer is Assistant Professor of English at the College of Charleston, where her research and teaching focuses on the reciprocal interactions among literature (especially contemporary British literature), critical theory, and academic culture. She has published articles on A.S. Bayatt, Salman Rushdie, and Ian McEwan, and her current project is a co-edited volume of essays, Radicality, Criticism, and Reality: The Future of Oppositional Critiques in Literary Studies. She is also an executive committee member of the UK Network for Modern Fiction Studies.

Eileen A. Joy is Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in English at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. She has published articles and book chapters on Beowulf, suicide terrorism and the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, Tony Kushner's play Homebody/Kabul and the Old English Ruin, historical artifacts and cultural memory, eros and Old English saints' lives, genocide in contemporary India and the Old English Wonders of the East, and the intellectual history of early modern bibliography. She is also the co-editor of The Postmodern Beowulf (2007) and Cultural Studies of the Modern Middle Ages (2007). [End Page 349]

Michael E. Moore has taught at Wellesley College and the University of Houston, and is currently Assistant Professor of Historical Studies at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He has published widely on cultural and intellectual traditions of the early Middle Ages, and on the political theories of the Merovingian-Carolingian period, which is the topic of his forthcoming book, A Sacred Kingdom.

Christine M. Neufeld is Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Eastern Michigan University. She has published in Florilegium and Oral Tradition, and has articles forthcoming in MMLA, Forum for Modern Language Studies, and Philological Quarterly. She is also the managing editor of The Once and Future Classroom: Resources for Teaching the Middle Ages in Grades K-12, a journal published electronically by The Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages (TEAMS).

Robin Norris completed her PhD in English at the University of Toronto in 2003 and is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Carleton University. Her research interests include mourning and masculinity, as well as gender in the saints' legends of Anglo-Saxon England.

Myra J. Seaman is Associate Professor of English at the College of Charleston and her work has been published in Studies in Philology, Medieval Perspectives, and Fifteenth-Century Studies, and she also has a chapter on Chaucer's dream visions in the MLA's Approaches to Teaching Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and the Shorter Poems. Her current project investigates the cultural work performed in fifteenth-century household miscellanies, and she is also the co-editor, with Eileen Joy, of Cultural Studies of the Modern Middle Ages.

Michael Uebel, PhD, LMSW, is a social worker, crisis counselor, psychotherapist, and teacher. He is writing a book on masochism as an index of post-war American social and moral consciousness. Shorter projects include essays on Gestalt therapy, environmentalism and social work, and the emotional life. He can be emailed at uebelm@sbcglobal.net. [End Page 350]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-9248
Print ISSN
1549-0815
Pages
pp. 349-350
Launched on MUSE
2008-02-18
Open Access
No
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