Abstract

African American college students attending predominately White institutions often encounter stressors that their Caucasian peers do not experience. Because of these unique stressors, African American students are more prone to experience psychological distress. Identifying factors that counteract psychological distress among these students is vital to increasing their sense of well being. This study examined parental attachments as a buffer against psychological distress among African American college students. Results demonstrated that maternal figures who were overprotective and controlling perpetuated psychological distress, whereas paternal figures who were warm and caring served as a buffer against psychological distress. Implications for mental health providers and college student personnel are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 31-40
Launched on MUSE
2008-01-21
Open Access
No
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