Abstract

Through a comparison of H.G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and Thomas Huxley's writings with recent U.S. policy decisions concerning stem cell research and the creation of chimeras, this article proposes that literary study should play a greater role in genetics policy debates. Cultural representations of genetics carry wide influence, and ethics commissions increasingly invoke literary and historical precedents to buttress their conclusions. Yet literary scholars and others in the humanities have largely been absent from the policy arena. Because of institutional shifts in the policy sphere, humanists have an opportunity to affect public policy more profoundly than at any time since the Victorian era.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-661X
Print ISSN
0028-6087
Pages
pp. 569-591
Launched on MUSE
2007-12-17
Open Access
No
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