In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Contributors

Timothy Bahti is Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan, and author of Allegories of History (Johns Hopkins 1992) and Ends of the Lyric (Johns Hopkins 1996), as well as co-editor of Jewish Writers, German Literature: The Uneasy Examples of Nelly Sachs and Walter Benjamin (Michigan 1995).

Tom Cohen is Director of the Program in Literary Theory and Cultural Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is the author of Anti-Mimesis (Cambridge 1994) and Ideology and Inscription (forthcoming Cambridge 1998). He is currently writing on the prosthesis of the visible in Hitchcock and editing the Cambridge Companion to Derrida.

Matt Hartman is a graduate student in the German Department at Johns Hopkins University. He is currently completing a dissertation on the concepts of theory and praxis in the eighteenth century.

Lieselotte E. Kurth is Professor Emerita in the German Department at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Die zweite Wirklichkeit: Studien zum Roman des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts (North Carolina 1969) and Perspectives and Points of View: The Early Works of Wieland and their Background (Johns Hopkins 1974), and has written numerous articles on eighteenth-century literature, especially Wieland. She is currently working on a study of reincarnation and sympathy in the literature of Weimar Classicism.

Ernesto Laclau is Professor of Government at the University of Essex. He is the author of Emancipation(s) (Verso 1996), New Reflections on the Revolution of our Time (Verso 1990), Politics and Ideology in Marxist Theory: Capitalism, Fascism, Populism (Verso 1979), and, with Chantal Mouffe, Hegemony and Socialist Strategy: Towards a Radically Democratic Politics (Verso 1985). “The Death and Resurrection of the Theory of Ideology” is being published in Britain in the Journal of Political Ideologies, 1:3 (1996).

Jan Mieszkowski is a graduate student in the German Department at Johns Hopkins University. He is currently completing a dissertation on the concept of freedom in the poetry and poetics of Romanticism.

Timothy Murray is Professor of English and Director of Graduate Studies in Film and Video at Cornell University. He is the author of Theatrical Legitimation: Allegories of Genius in Seventeenth-Century England and France (Oxford 1987), Like a Film: Ideological Fantasy on Screen, Camera, and Canvas (Routledge 1993), and Drama Trauma: Specters of Race and Sexuality in Performance, Video, and Art (Routledge 1997), and the editor of Mimesis, Masochism, and Mime: The Politics of Theatricality in Contemporary French Thought (Michigan 1997). This essay is part of a book in progress on video, electronic art, and the baroque.

Sarah Roff is a graduate student in the Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins University. She is currently completing a dissertation on psychoanalysis and the philosophy of history.

James Swenson is Assistant Professor of French at Rutgers University.

Michael Sprinker teaches Comparative Literature at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is co-editor (with Mike Davis) of the Haymarket series from Verso, and (with Richard Macksey) of the Literature, Culture, Theory series from Cambridge University Press. He is the author of A Counterpoint of Dissonance: The Aesthetics and Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins (Johns Hopkins 1980), Imaginary Relations: Aesthetics and Ideology in the Theory of Historical Materialism (Verso 1987), and History and Ideology in Proust: À la recherche du temps perdu and the Third French Republic (Cambridge 1994).

Tim Walters is Visiting Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. His essay is part of a forthcoming book, Hegel’s Last Words: Critique and the Politics of Position.

Irene Wei is a graduate student in the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California at Irvine. She is currently completing a dissertation on the problem of culture and the relation between aesthetics and politics in the inter-war period.

...

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6598
Print ISSN
0026-7910
Pages
pp. 495-496
Launched on MUSE
1997-04-28
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.