Abstract

By the late nineteenth century, achievements in cartography and unprecedented advances in transportation and telecommunications had effected a sense of the world as a smaller, more tightly-networked place. Conrad's fiction, this article argues, reveals his ambivalent response to this experience of spatial compression: on the one hand, Conrad's notorious obscurity attempts to re-mystify a world that has been thoroughly mapped and unveiled; on the other, his subversion of romance and his use of coincidence are textual strategies that register precisely what his obscurity tries to evade—the reality of a shrinking world. Conrad's formal innovations are therefore inextricably bound up with his spatial imagination.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 1-19
Launched on MUSE
2007-10-30
Open Access
No
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