Abstract

The "major Islamic philosophers," writes Deborah Black, "produced no works dedicated to aesthetics, although their writings do address issues that contemporary philosophers might study under that heading." The emergent theme in this essay is that classical Islamic philosophy may be studied within a framework of aesthetics. To achieve this goal, the metaphysics of Abu Hamid al-Ghazālī (1058–1111) and the aesthetics of Arthur Schopenhauer (1788–1860) will be brought together.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1898
Print ISSN
0031-8221
Pages
pp. 409-419
Launched on MUSE
2007-10-24
Open Access
No
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