Abstract

Recent works have recovered the ethical and political value of shame, suggesting that if shame is felt for the right reasons, toxic forms of shame may be alleviated. Rereading Hannah Arendt's biography of the "conscious pariah," Rahel Varnhagen, Locke concludes that a politics of shame does not have the radical potential its proponents seek. Access to a public world, not shaming those who shame us, catapults the shamed pariah into the practices of democratic citizenship.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2001
Print ISSN
0887-5367
Pages
pp. 146-162
Launched on MUSE
2007-09-17
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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