Abstract

This article examines a number of the more well-known theories of the foundations of human rights that have been developed in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and adds to this discussion the voice of a less well-known theorist of human rights, Hannah Arendt. The traditional theories of the foundations of human rights are divided into two camps, the essentialists and the anti-essentialists, and the benefits and limitations of each camp are analyzed. The author then articulates Arendt's view of human rights and situates her voice within the contemporary debate on human rights.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 754-778
Launched on MUSE
2007-08-23
Open Access
No
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