Abstract

This article explores what long-standing analytical traditions in Pacific ethnographies can offer Pacific diaspora studies. In particular, I advocate researchers' reconceptualizing their unit of analysis when interrogating the relationships between families and diasporas, and argue that family networks fashion diasporas' longevity and tangibility. Emphasizing families' social organization encourages Pacific diaspora studies to focus on how and when cultural differences have effects.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-9464
Print ISSN
1043-898X
Pages
pp. 474-502
Launched on MUSE
2007-08-13
Open Access
No
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