Abstract

By focusing on the informal legacies that still shape the democracies of Central and Eastern Europe, we can attain a nuanced understanding of the region's postcommunist countries. In Poland, confrontational maximalism helps to generate governmental instability and poor policy continuity, while in Hungary there is now a question mark hanging over the future of the bounded flexibility that once reliably helped to center democratic politics. In the Czech Republic, instrumentalist attitudes and partisan-ideological differentiation jointly increase the chances of serious corruption and polarization, while in Slovakia the democratic system appears to lack an endogenous force capable of effectively confronting bigotry and discrimination.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3214
Print ISSN
1045-5736
Pages
pp. 156-170
Launched on MUSE
2007-07-31
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.