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  • Color Plates

Color Plate A


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No. 1.

Bill Codding, The Burninator II, propane, steel, wire, valves, computer, 2006. This large-scale fire installation, first shown at Burning Man 2006, consists of 12 flame towers spread over 1,000 feet. (See Burning Man Statement by Bill Codding.)

© Bill Codding. Photo © Steve Fritz


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No. 2.

Joe Bard and Danya Parkinson, Pendul-up of Fire, steel, aluminum, brass, propane, 27 X 40 ft, 2005. Electric solenoid valves dispense propane, and ball bearing pivots give the structure silky action. The piece is a definite crowd pleaser for those who watch and wait, wondering where it will go and when it will stop. (See Burning Man Statement by Joe Bard and Danya Parkinson.)

© Joe Bard and Danya Parkinson. Photo © Louis M. Brill

[End Page 327]

Color Plate B


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No. 1.

Larry Breed, The Chaotick, plywood, sheet metal, agricultural pipes and gearing, surplus electronics, car battery, 20 ft high, 4-ft-square base, 1999. Like moths drawn to light, people come to watch The Chaotick as it presents itself as a disembodied sprite engaged in fiery aerobatics. (See Burning Man Statement by Larry Breed.)

© Larry Breed. Photo © Tristan Savatier


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No. 2.

Kasia Wojnarski, The Burning Tree, steel, stainless steel wool and propane, root diameter approx. 16 ft, canopy height approx. 13 ft, 2006. The Burning Tree combines the imagery of the biblical Burning Bush with the Tree of Life, which has appeared in almost every major culture, in various forms, with one unifying thread: the tree stands as a symbol of the human condition. (See Burning Man section introduction by Louis M. Brill.)

© Kasia Wojnarski. Photo © Josh Miller

[End Page 328]

Color Plate C


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Kiki Pettit, Egeria, copper, steel, ceramics, water, fuel, 12-X-10-ft diameter, 2002. This 13-ft fire-fall dispenses streams of fire into the surrounding fountain. People are drawn to touch the fire in an intimate and personal way. (See Burning Man section introduction by Louis M. Brill.)

© Kiki Pettit. Photo © Gabe Kirchheimer

[End Page 329]

Color Plate D


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No. 1.

Therm, The Thermokraken, steel, propane, ethanol and flame, 23 X 5 ft, 2002. Affectionately dubbed "Kraken," she is equal parts bomb, jet engine and organ-pipe. (See Burning Man Statement by Andrew Sano.)

© Therm. Photo © Mike Woolson


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No. 2.

Therm, Exxothermia, steel, fire, ice, 2.5 X 1.5 X 8 ft, 2006. Three monoliths of ice on sculptural metal bases contain within them two fire tubes each, into which flames are introduced at the base. As the tubes become red hot, the ice begins to melt and clouds of steam hiss and roil into the night air. (See Burning Man section introduction by Louis M. Brill.)

© Therm. Photo © Mike Woolson

[End Page 330]

Color Plate E


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Charlie Smith and Jaime Ladet, Fire Cauldrons, steel fire cauldron at dawn, 60 in X 40 in X 160 in, 2005. At Burning Man, Fire Cauldrons are used as "social enablers" that act as a central point for bringing people together to celebrate their presence and community. (See Burning Man Statement by Charlie Smith.)

© Charlie Smith and Jaime Ladet. Photo © Jaime Ladet

[End Page 331]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9282
Print ISSN
0024-094X
Pages
pp. 327-331
Launched on MUSE
2007-07-30
Open Access
No
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