Abstract

Perceptions of children and teachers were examined to address concerns regarding children's welfare following sociometric testing. Third-graders (N = 91) were interviewed; teachers also reported on each child's responses to the testing. Results indicate that children were not hurt or upset by the testing, most enjoyed the procedures, did not feel that their peers treated them any differently following the testing, and understood their research rights. There were no relations between social preference as determined by peer nominations and teacher- and self-reported responses to sociometric testing. The implications of these results for the design and implementation of careful, ethical sociometric research with children are discussed.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1535-0266
Print ISSN
0272-930X
Pages
pp. 53-78
Launched on MUSE
2007-05-03
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.