Abstract

Children's Literature post 1970 does not often tackle the First World War, and this paper investigates why this might be so. What emerges are a series of texts which are often received with some acclaim, but are also restricted to very specific patterns of representation. These patterns clearly follow a morally didactic way of representing WW1, one which often restricts the ability of writers to diversify their writing and seek alternative representations. This paper examines the way that several texts have dealt with these 'parables' of warfare, and asks whether diversification might be a more healthy alternative.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6563
Print ISSN
0147-2593
Pages
pp. 176-188
Launched on MUSE
2007-04-26
Open Access
No
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