Abstract

Due to its high casualties and the deadly nature of trench warfare, the First World War was an important influence on British culture and literature in the post-war years. This is also apparent in popular children's fiction which was used as a means of instructing the future generation in the significance of the past conflict. By analysing a selection of novels published between 1919 and 1939, this article examines which images of the war were (re)created for a child readership and whether children's fiction, like many canonized adult novels, remember the war as a horrible and futile experience.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6563
Print ISSN
0147-2593
Pages
pp. 147-161
Launched on MUSE
2007-04-26
Open Access
No
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