Abstract

In "The University Without Condition" Derrida imagines a university-to-come. His projection repeats familiar Enlightenment theses concerning freedom of thought. But his insistence upon the university's exemption from conditions bleeds over into the way he conceptualizes his own argument. He renounces any account of determinations and interests in the formation both of the university and of those who would inhibit its freedom. This leaves him with no means to explain how the university-to-come could be freed from these constraints, and limits him to a technology of miracles as the only cognizable means for achieving the changes he so fervently wishes for.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 425-441
Launched on MUSE
2007-04-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.