Abstract

This article discusses the several reasons for the complex relationship between social history and world history. It notes also the increasing interest among social historians for reconsidering their geographical range and base, which provides new opportunities for interaction between the fields. Using childhood as an example, the article argues for the mutual utility of running social history topics through world history periodization and related concerns with interregional contacts.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8050
Print ISSN
1045-6007
Pages
pp. 43-52
Launched on MUSE
2007-02-27
Open Access
No
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