Abstract

Instead of treating "The Patagonia" as a lesser experiment in the international theme, this essay analyzes the story as a transnational text. Against the background of the social and cultural history of the Atlantic, it discusses symbolic connections between the illicit affair and suicide of protagonist Grace Mavis on the one hand and the colonial imaginary, technology, and observation on the other. It examines possible influences of late nineteenth-century images of Patagonia on James's story, arguing that the tale plays with the idea of innocent exploration only in order to expose the notion as fictitious.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 1-12
Launched on MUSE
2007-02-07
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.