Abstract

In "Daisy Miller" (1878), Henry James alludes to Shelley, Keats, and Byron, three defiant Romantic poets of dubious reputation who died young in a foreign country, to create a rich context for his tale of an innocent abroad. James sets Daisy's excitement and pleasure in her travels on Lake Geneva and in Rome in the historical context of the Protestant Cemetery, the Château of Chillon, and the Colosseum, places filled with blood, pain and death, which foreshadow her untimely end.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 94-100
Launched on MUSE
2007-02-07
Open Access
No
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