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  • Color Plates

Color Plate A


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No. 1. Joseph Nechvatal, Orgiastic abattOir, digital image, 2004. Nechvatal's digital images, essays and projects are writhing convergences of human flesh and digital viruses. See article by Ebon Fisher.

© Joseph Nechvatal


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No. 2. Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Soft Sell, Times Square, 1993. Courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The multimedia installation's spontaneous engagement of pedestrians affords new ways of defining the architectural experience. See article by Therese Tierney.

Photo © Maggie Hopp

[End Page 43]

Color Plate B


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Frederick Loomis, Direct Optical Interface into DIOS, graphite and color pencil on paper, 14 × 17 in, 2003. A Mind Map depicting the DIOS direct optical interface, providing the coming race of Human Computers immediate entry into the DIOS mythological memory, enabling them to instantaneously associate meaning to visual images. The direct optical interface resides in the irises of their eyes. See Frederick Loomis's statement in the Leonardo Gallery: The Dream of Reason.

© Frederick Loomis. Courtesy of Franklin Williams, New York

[End Page 44]

Color Plate C


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No. 1. Anthony Discenza, Host, digital video, continuous loop projection, 72 in high, 2004. The artist appropriates visual material from mass entertainment and breaks it down through a process of re-recording, compression and signal degradation. See Anthony Discenza's statement in the Leonardo Gallery: The Dream of Reason.

© Anthony Discenza


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No. 2. Sarita Dev and Maurits Kelder, Himalaya's Head, multi-user installation, 2005. Participants controlling the movements of virtual 3D snowballs with their head movements.

© Sarita Dev

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Color Plate D


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Alberto T. Estévez, Genetic Barcelona Project. (a) The magical light of the potential GFP trees (illustration by Aleix Bieto and Gabriel Montañés). (b) Lemon tree leaf with GFP (photo taken by Alberto T. Estévez with conventional reflex photo camera). (c) Comparison between lemon tree leaf with GFP and a type "fine" lemon tree leaf without GFP (photo taken by Alberto T. Estévez with conventional reflex camera). (d) Comparison between a type "fine" lemon tree leaf with GFP (right) and a type "fine" leaf without GFP (photo by Josep Clotet and Alberto T. Estévez taken with a special UV photo camera). (e) The same leaves as in (d) after the elapse of 5 minutes, demonstrating that the light is constant and not an instant effect (photo by Josep Clotet and Alberto T. Estévez taken with a special UV photo camera).

© Alberto T. Estévez

[End Page 46]

Color Plate E


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A sequence of still images from a Pars Video documentary of Iannis Xenakis's Polytope de Persépolis, performed at the 1971 Shiraz Arts Festival. See article by Robert Gluck.

[End Page 47]

Color Plate F


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These color stills demonstrate two different approaches to the application of symmetry to the image: as an all-over compositional device (left), or as the determinant for specific forms (right). Black marks indicate frame lines. (left) Consecutive frames from Stan Brakhage's Chartres Series, 16 mm film, 1994. These organic forms are bilaterally symmetrical, and the coloring further breaks the individual sections into smaller forms; the alternation in these is between all-over structures and individual forms, related via symmetry. (Courtesy of the Estate of Stan Brakhage and Fred Camper <www.fredcamper.com>.) (right) Stills from Michael Betancourt's Eigengift, 2006, a movie realized through the application of this taxonomy to the production of imagery—both individual forms and all-over composition.

© Marilyn Brakhage © Michael Betancourt

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Color Plate G


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No. 1. Selected frames from a "virtual slipstream" visualization of blood-flow dynamics from the aneurysm simulation depicted in Fig. 2. (Image from D.A. Steinman et al., "Image-Based Computational Simulation of Flow Dynamics in a Giant Intracranial Aneurysm," American Journal of Neuroradiology 24 [2003] pp. 559-566.) The top and bottom rows show the aneurysm in lateral and...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9282
Print ISSN
0024-094X
Pages
pp. 43-50
Launched on MUSE
2007-02-05
Open Access
No
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