Abstract

This paper explores Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust and Zeinabu irene Davis's Mother of the River. Both films utilize materials obtained from oral tradition, which have been preserved through generations of African Americans whose forebears were forcefully carried away from Africa due to the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. In these films, we see a reaffirmation of African dignity through a commemoration of African culture and its continuing relevance in the lives of Africans in the Diaspora. The paper examines the stereotype question, and how filmmakers like Julie Dash and Zeinabu irene Davis who belong to the L.A. Rebellion school use their films to combat these stereotypes and engage their viewers in new images.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1542-4286
Print ISSN
0093-3139
Pages
pp. 156-173
Launched on MUSE
2007-01-25
Open Access
No
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