Abstract

Chaucer transformed Boccaccio's Criseida to create a female character imbued with agency: his Criseyde mobilises Boethian philosophy in order to negotiate the pressures upon her. Not only is she characterised as vital to the poem's Boethian frame, but her agency and philosophical acuity provide an explanation for her 'betrayal' of Troilus. Yet ultimately, the incompatibility of Boethian philosophy with the romance genre results in Criseyde's exclusion from the poem's ending, as Troilus rejects the romantic love it has hitherto represented and privileges a Boethian perspective on the futility of earthly cares. Criseyde's absence from this problematic conclusion has tended to obscure her Boethian pragmatism and the significance of her agency.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1832-8334
Print ISSN
0313-6221
Pages
pp. 35-56
Launched on MUSE
2007-01-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.