Abstract

This article argues that World War I poets such as Isaac Rosenberg and Edmund Blunden did not write their best poetry about WWI trench warfare by breaking with late-Romantic and Georgian traditions of poetry and writing "realistically" about trench warfare. Rather they adapted the nineteenth-century Romantic lyric to treat the new subject matter of modern war. Drawing on recent theories of genre, the paper shows through a close reading of several war poems and poets how the poetry of both major and minor poets exhibits a generic continuity, not a break, with the dominant tradition of Romantic poetry going back to Wordsworth.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 104-128
Launched on MUSE
2006-11-16
Open Access
No
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