Abstract

This essay argues that Sweet and Sour Milk, which should be understood as both a political and literary text, "does history," which is not to say that it merely "tells" the history of postcolonial Somalia, but that it participates in a kind of historiography that is, to borrow a phrase from Edward Said, both "frankly revisionist" and "fiercely theoretical and intellectually insurrectionary." In this paper, using the theoretical work of a group of Indian historians, collected in the journal of SubalternStudies over the past two decades, I show how Nuruddin Farah's Sweet and Sour Milk uses the trope of "silence" to dramatize the potentially fruitful (and problematic) process of writing histories "from below."

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2044
Print ISSN
0034-5210
Pages
pp. 161-176
Launched on MUSE
2006-10-23
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.