Abstract

Frantz Fanon's writings are evoked in a variety of disciplines where groups of disenfranchised or marginalized peoples can be identified. More recently, his work has spawned discussion of the negotiating between such margins and more centrally identifiable locations of power. Fanon figures prominently in the notion of hybridity as it has been debated in postcolonial studies, particularly as a form of resistance that can be discerned in culture. In this reading of crucial passages taken mostly from chapter five of Black Skin White Masks, I suggest some significant ways in which the narrative shifts of this text operate an aesthetic and ethical pressure on salient understandings of hybridity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2044
Print ISSN
0034-5210
Pages
pp. 189-210
Launched on MUSE
2006-10-23
Open Access
No
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