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Contributors

Kay Boardman teaches English Literature at the University of Central Lancashire. She has published articles in Journal of Victorian Culture and Victorian Periodicals Review. She has edited Victorian Women's Magazines: An Anthology (with Margaret Beetham, 2001), and Popular Victorian Women's Writing (with Shirley Jones, 2004). She is currently working on Eliza Lynn Linton.

Amanda Claybaugh teaches in the English department at Columbia University; she is the author of the forthcoming The Novel of Purpose: Literature and Social Reform in the Anglo- American World.

Julie M. Dugger is Associate Professor of Languages and Literature at Benedictine University. Her previous publications include articles on Percy Shelley's political activism and the figure of the editor in Charles Dickens's Hard Times.

Martin Hewitt is Professor of Victorian Studies at Trinity and All Saints, Leeds, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Victorian Culture. His publications include An Age of Equipoise? Reassessing Mid-Victorian Britain (2000) and The Emergence of Stability in the Industrial City: Manchester, 1832–67 (1996). Andrew Vincent is Professor of Political Theory at University of Sheffield and Director of the Sheffield Centre for Political Theory and Ideologies. He is the author of Philosophy, Politics, and Citizenship (1984), Theories of the State (1987), Modern Political Ideologies (1995), A Radical Hegelian: The Social and Political Philosophy of Henry Jones (with David Boucher, 1993), British Idealism and Political Theory (with David Boucher, 2001), Nationalism and Particularity (2002), and The Nature of Political Theory (2004).

Andrew Vincent is Professor of Political Theory at University of Sheffield and Director of the Sheffield Centre for Political Theory and Ideologies. He is the author of Philosophy, Politics, and Citizenship (1984), Theories of the State (1987), Modern Political Ideologies (1995), A Radical Hegelian: The Social and Political Philosophy of Henry Jones (with David Boucher, 1993), British Idealism and Political Theory (with David Boucher, 2001), Nationalism and Particularity (2002), and The Nature of Political Theory (2004).

Stephen Arata is Associate Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Fictions of Loss in the Victorian Fin de Siècle (1996).

Linda M. Austin is the author of The Practical Ruskin (1991) and essays on Victorian literature and culture. Her new book, Nostalgia in Transition, 1780–1917, will appear in 2007.

Robert Terrell Bledsoe is Professor of English at the University of Texas at El Paso. His book, Henry Fothergill Chorley: Victorian Journalist, appeared in 1998 and he has published on various aspects of nineteenth-century culture in PMLA, Victorian Studies, Women and Literature, Dickens Studies Annual, The Oxford Companion to Dickens, Nineteenth Century British Music Studies, The New Grove Dictionary of Music (2nd ed.), and The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

John Broich is Visiting Assistant Professor of European Environmental History at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

Christina Crosby is Professor of English and Feminist Studies at Wesleyan University. Her most recent essay, “Writer's Block, Merit, and the Market: Working in the University of Excellence” (2003), draws lessons for the present from her current project on Victorian economies of value and Victorian novels.

Kenneth Daley is the Department of English Chairperson at Columbia College Chicago, and the author of The Rescue of Romanticism: Walter Pater and John Ruskin (2001). He is currently working on a study of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Victorian ekphrasis.

Juilee Decker is Assistant Professor of Art History at Georgetown College. Her current project considers connections between characteristically “English” landscapes and the larger themes of national identity and Empire studies from c. 1750–1850, seeking associations between authors and artists while tracing the circuits of production and consumption of landscapes in visual and verbal formats.

Theresa A. Dougal is Associate Professor and Chair of English at Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. She is currently at work on a creative project involving the life and writings of Mary Wollstonecraft.

Francis L. Fennell is Professor of English at Loyola University Chicago. He has published extensively on Victorian literature, especially Hopkins and the Pre-Raphaelites, but also on John Henry Newman, George Eliot, John Ruskin, and Charlotte Brontë. He is completing a book on how Victorian authors are read and received outside of current academic discourse.

Martin Fichman is Professor...


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