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  • Contributors

Carolyn de la Peña

Carolyn de la Peña is an associate professor of American studies at the University of California, Davis. Her research and teaching interests focus on popular technology and science, material and business cultures, and food. De la Peña's current project is a cultural history of artificial sweeteners in the United States. She has written previously on the machines of Krispy Kreme, the video immersion environments of Prada Soho, and the I-ON-A-CO electric belt of Henry Gaylord Wilshire. Her book The Body Electric: How Strange Machines Built the Modern American was published in 2003.

Debra DeRuyver

Debra DeRuyver is director of membership for the International Leadership Association. She is ABD in American studies from the University of Maryland, where she taught courses on electronic publications and virtual exhibitions, online activism, and dance in American culture. She holds a master's degree in American studies from California State University, Fullerton, and a bachelor's degree in English literature from the University of Michigan. She previously worked at the National Archives and Records Administration as a reference archivist. In 1999, DeRuyver was one of four founding editors of the Public History Resource Center (PHRC) (http://www.publichistory.org). She has continued to serve as a managing editor since that time, publishing more than seventy-five reviews written by information scientists or subject specialists. In 2000, PHRC won the National Council on Public History's Student Project Award. She can be reached at editors@publichistory.org.

Joel Dinerstein

Joel Dinerstein is an assistant professor of English at Tulane University, where he also teaches in the American studies program. He is the author of Swinging the Machine: Modernity, Technology, and African American Culture between the World Wars (2003), which was awarded the 2004 Eugene M. Kayden Book Prize, given annually to the best book in the humanities published by an American university press. He is presently at work on The Cool Mask: Jazz, Noir, and Existentialism, 1940-1960, a book that will analyze the emergence of the concept of cool in American society. [End Page 981]

Susan J. Douglas

Susan J. Douglas is the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and chair of the department. She is author of The Mommy Myth: The Idealization of Motherhood and How It Undermines Women (with Meredith Michaels, 2004); Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination (1999), which won the Hacker Prize in 2000 for the best popular book about technology and culture; Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media (1994 and 1995); and Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899-1922 (1987).

Jennifer Evans

Jennifer Evans is an archivist at the National Archives and Records Administration in the Office of Presidential Libraries, where she is responsible for Web site content and development. She holds master's degrees in history and library science from the University of Maryland and earned her bachelor's degree in English literature from Randolph-Macon Woman's College. She previously worked as an archivist in the University of Maryland Libraries' Special Collections Division. In 1999, Evans was one of four founding editors of the Public History Resource Center (PHRC) (http://www.publichistory.org). She has continued to serve as a managing editor since that time, publishing more than seventy-five reviews written by information scientists or subject specialists. In 2000, PHRC won the National Council on Public History's Student Project Award. She can be reached at editors@publichistory.org.

Nicole R. Fleetwood

Nicole R. Fleetwood is assistant professor of American studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She writes and teaches in the fields of media studies, technology studies, gender studies, and theories of race and ethnicity.

Rayvon Fouché

Rayvon Fouché is an associate professor of history and African American studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. As a historian of technology, he explores the multiple intersections and relationships between cultural representation, racial identification, scientific practice, and technological design. He is the author of Black Inventors in the Age of Segregation (2005) and coeditor of Appropriating Technology: Vernacular Science and Social Power (2004). [End Page 982]

Carma Gorman

Carma Gorman is an associate professor...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6490
Print ISSN
0003-0678
Pages
pp. 981-985
Launched on MUSE
2006-10-04
Open Access
No
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