Abstract

In Ulysses, James Joyce draws deeply on his own experiences and those of people he had known. An excellent example is Dr. John J. O'Hare, whose tragically young death resulted from an illness contracted while on duty as a public health officer. Joyce transfers various of O'Hare's traits into two fictional Ulysses medical men, the late Dr. O'Hare and the living Dr. Dixon. By reshaping elements of the real O'Hare into these two fictional doctors, Joyce thematizes major issues inherent in human experience.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6571
Print ISSN
0278-9671
Pages
pp. 182-204
Launched on MUSE
2000-10-01
Open Access
No
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