Abstract

Joseph Heco, a Japanese castaway who spent the 1850s working and studying in the US, played a significant role as translator, entrepreneur, and advisor after returning to Japan. This article examines the circum-Pacific contexts and stylistic idiosyncrasies of Heco's autobiographical Narrative of a Japanese, arguing that its formal flaws reflect disjunctions between the conventions of equality that underwrite Western autobiography and the uneven conditions governing Japan's forced modernization.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 273-306
Launched on MUSE
2006-08-17
Open Access
No
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