Abstract

The suffering and illness central to Elizabeth Freke's narrative of her life reflect a sensibility new to early domestic autobiography. Unusually sensitive to the realities of sickness and infirmity, she fashions a sense of self meaningful in immediate personal and physical rather than spiritual terms. In the misfortunes of illness and death Elizabeth Freke sees confirmation of herself as a long-suffering yet defiant wife, mother, and widow.

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6571
Print ISSN
0278-9671
Pages
pp. 225-243
Launched on MUSE
1996-10-01
Open Access
No
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