Abstract

An examination of the throngs of 'film-smitten girls' who arrived in early Hollywood in search of stardom, which demonstrates how the influx of single, transitory women to Los Angeles prompted early attempts to regulate not only female labour, but private conduct as well. The 'problem' of the 'extra girl' in Hollywood became not only an important labour issue but a key ideological concern as well, because it foregrounded how the industry's interests and economic power negotiated with civic, cultural, and social elites a 'proper place' for movies, especially the right role female spectators might play in relation to the cinema and the act of film consumption.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1553-3905
Print ISSN
0892-2160
Pages
pp. 129-139
Launched on MUSE
2006-04-26
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.