Abstract

Curricula in U.S. colleges and universities have historically evolved around two ideal types: arts and science fields (A&S), and vocational fields. Using the National Educational Longitudinal Study, 1992–1994, we find that high socioeconomic status (SES) students are more likely to choose A&S fields than are low-SES students. The Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study, 1993–1997, shows that vocational majors are employed at higher paying jobs than are A&S majors 4 years after college graduation, while arts and science majors are more likely to enroll in graduate school during these years. We conclude that these distinct educational trajectories reinforce the relationship between parents' and their children's social class.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4640
Print ISSN
0022-1546
Pages
pp. 497-538
Launched on MUSE
2006-05-02
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
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