Abstract

This essay reads Ann Radcliffe's celebrated landscapes in light of their remarkable infusion with "every colour that paints the rainbow"—an infusion that links Radcliffe's gothic fictions with contemporary aesthetic theory. But that theory often doubled as a kind of early speech act theory, and against its background, I argue, Radcliffe's colors emerge as a mode and method of signaling the presence and politics of linguistic mediation. Radcliffe herself identifies "tint" and "hue" with the ever-inadequate "colours of language," allowing us to read Radcliffe's landscapes as subversive pictures of nothing but the (here feminine) perception that frames them.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 377-390
Launched on MUSE
2006-04-10
Open Access
No
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