Abstract

This article presents the pottery and figurines recovered from a Mycenaean rubbish pit excavated by the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project at Tsoungiza in 1984–1985. The deposit appears to preserve a complete range of vessels used for personal consumption, serving, cooking, storage, and other household activities, with nearly all diagnostic sherds dating to Late Helladic IIIB1. Analysis of this material suggests that, despite variations in the frequencies of some closed vessels and kraters, the residents of this small Mycenaean community had access to the same range of ceramics in use at the palace centers. The production and distribution of much Mycenaean pottery therefore may not have been controlled directly by the palaces.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-5622
Print ISSN
0018-098X
Pages
pp. 451-573
Launched on MUSE
2006-02-22
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2006
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