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American Literary History 18.1 (2006) 218



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Notes on Contributors

Max Cavitch Assistant Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of American Elegy: Poetry of Mourning from the Puritans to Whitman.
Mary Chapman Associate Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. She is currently researching a study of American suffrage literature and modernist print culture.
Kris Fresonke Assistant Professor of English at Adelphi University. She is the author of West of Emerson: The Design of Manifest Destiny and coeditor of Lewis and Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives.
Randall Fuller Associate Professor of English at Drury University. His articles have appeared or are forthcoming in American Literature, Early American Literature, and ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance.
Paul Jay Professor of English at Loyola University Chicago. He is the author of Contingency Blues: The Search for Foundations in American Criticism. His recent essays advocate resituating US literary studies in a hemispheric context and explore the impact of globalization on literary studies.
Deborah Nelson Associate Professor of English at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America. The article here represents a first step in a new project, Tough Broads.
Miles Orvell Professor of English and American Studies at Temple University. He has a broad interest in literature, visual culture, technology, and urban design. He is the author of The Real Thing, After the Machine, and American Photography.
Jason Puskar Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His essay is part of a book he is completing on the literature of accident in an American insurance culture.
Sean Teuton Assistant Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of the forthcoming Red Land, Red Power: Grounding Knowledge in the American Indian Novel.
Jeffrey J. Williams Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. His most recent book is the collection Critics at Work: Interviews 1993–2003. He is a co-editor of The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism and, since 1992, editor of the minnesota review.


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Additional Information

ISSN
1468-4365
Print ISSN
0896-7148
Pages
p. 218
Launched on MUSE
2006-02-01
Open Access
No
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