Abstract

Working within the new historiography of the body, this essay argues that convents served as a convenient metaphor for Canada in the mid-eighteenth century English and Anglo-American imagination: They were French, Catholic, feminized, and most disturbingly, closed to Protestant men. In describing French Canada and its convents, they used language that suggests their fascination with opening and penetrating this new addition to the empire, despite the fact that the Quebec Ursulines were in fact very open to visitors, even to Protestant men. Esther Wheelwright, the Ursulines' New England-born Mother Superior, played a large role in English-language fictional and historical representations of the convent in the 1750s and 1760s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 187-200
Launched on MUSE
2005-12-06
Open Access
No
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