Abstract

This essay investigates how Steele uses Spectator 11's heroine, Arietta, to challenge the classical story of the Ephesian Matron, and to suggest some of the eighteenth-century limits of the classical tradition for women and the variety of Others that tradition excludes. Although critics have claimed that the Spectator represents an optimistic response to the challenges of modernity, essays like Steele's "Inkle and Yarico," and even Spectator 69, allusively evoke a stronger sense of uncertainty, and suggest that the past continues to serve as a dangerous template for commonplace antifeminism and the potential brutality and self-interest of colonial expansion.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 201-226
Launched on MUSE
2005-12-06
Open Access
No
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