Abstract

What have come to be known as the varied forces and processes of globalization—including trade liberalization, real-time information and communications technology, and the privatization of state enterprise—have diverse implications (both positive and inimical) to the promotion and protection of the right to culture in contemporary Africa. While pointing out that culture is a dynamic aspect of human evolution, the article explores what implications globalization has for ensuring that its positive aspects are protected, while the negative are not given free reign. In particular, the article pays particular attention to the concept of traditional knowledge and women's human rights and the role of the African Commission in dealing with globalization's most adverse consequences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 1245-1273
Launched on MUSE
2005-11-10
Open Access
No
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