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  • Contributors

Tom Glynn is the Anglo-American history and political science selector and a reference librarian at Rutgers University Libraries. He holds an undergraduate degree in history from the University of Chicago and a master’s degree in history and in library science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is currently writing his Ph.D. dissertation on the history of public libraries in New York City during the nineteenth century.

Edward A. Goedeken is the humanities bibliographer at the Iowa State University Library in Ames. He holds an undergraduate degree in history from William Penn College, a master’s degree in American history from Iowa State University, an M.L.S. from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Kansas. He is a frequent contributor to history and library journals, including Libraries & Culture, and his special interests include biographical studies of librarians. He is currently working on a historical study of the Iowa State University Library.

Craig C. Hagensick is a research analyst at the Supreme Court of Minnesota in Saint Paul. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science and international relations from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, a master’s degree in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Quantitative classification, categorical data analysis, and empirical historical analysis are his major research interests.

Mary Hammond is a lecturer in publishing and media at the School of Humanities and Cultural Studies, Middlesex University, London. She holds an undergraduate degree in English literature from the University of Southampton and a master’s degree in culture and social change from the same institution, and she is working on a dissertation, “Readers and National Identity in England, 1880–1914,” at the University of Southampton. Her interests focus on library history, publishing, and distribution practices in the nineteenth century, including the histories of railway bookstalls and the Oxford University Press.

Bill Olbrich is the government publications librarian at Washington University in St. Louis. He holds an undergraduate degree in history from Southwestern University, an M.L.S. from the University of Texas, and a master’s degree in American history from the University of Iowa. He is completing his dissertation on antebellum library use in St. Louis for a Ph.D. in American history from the University of Missouri.

Stefan C. Reif is the director of the Genizah Research Unit and head of the Oriental Division at the University Library at the University of Cambridge. He is the professor of medieval Hebrew studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies and a fellow of St. John’s College. His major fields of research are Jewish liturgy and the Cairo Genizah, and he is the author of eight books and over 240 scholarly articles and reviews. His most recent publications are Hebrew Manuscripts at Cambridge University Library (Cambridge, 1997), A Jewish Archive from Old Cairo (Richmond, Surrey, 2000), and Why Medieval Hebrew Studies? (Cambridge, 2001).

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 181-182
Launched on MUSE
2002-05-01
Open Access
No
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