Abstract

The cloak of silence surrounding collaboration in South Korea was lifted in the 1980s as part of the wider political struggle for democratization. Initially, the discourse on collaboration was caught in the same nationalist paradigm as the state-sanctioned narrative it sought to undermine. By the late 1990s, with democracy firmly established and a new, less-politicized generation of historians entering the field, the historiography of collaboration moved beyond facile incriminations and judgments toward a more comprehensive understanding of this delicate issue. Historical understanding does not, however, resolve the enduring demand for (moral) justice.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1529
Print ISSN
0145-840X
Pages
pp. 207-242
Launched on MUSE
2001-12-01
Open Access
No
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