Abstract

This paper offiers (i) an interpretation of Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh as an epistemological novel, focusing on its depiction of such intellectual vices as self-deception, hypocrisy, and sham inquiry, and its exploration of the growth of Ernest Pontifex's intellectual character; (ii) analyses of pseudo-belief and pseudo-inquiry; and (iii) an explanation of why the ideal of intellectual integrity is so often met with indifference or even hostilityÑin general, and in today's academy in particular.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-661X
Print ISSN
0028-6087
Pages
pp. 359-373
Launched on MUSE
2005-09-23
Open Access
No
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