Abstract

Historically, federal student aid focused on expanding financial access for low-income students, but this goal is no longer central to federal policy. This article examines how the financial reasons for choosing a college and the actual costs of attending college influence persistence by African Americans and Whites. It reveals diverse patterns of educational choice with continuities across the choice sequence. African Americans were more adversely influenced by grant inadequacy than Whites were. These findings support the argument that the decline in federal grants was a contributing factor to the gap in postsecondary opportunity that opened after 1980.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4640
Print ISSN
0022-1546
Pages
pp. 545-569
Launched on MUSE
2005-08-09
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
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