Abstract

An ethical analysis is particularly apt for explaining sites of contested values. The Spectator papers demonstrate the term "wit" to be such a site, revealing rather than resolving the various cultural demands, energies, and desires attached to language in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In his extended series on wit, Joseph Addison fuses politics, epistemology, and aesthetics in the value-laden discourse that is the tool as well as the product of internalized regulation, but as he does so he also reveals the power and appeal of the habits of mind and language he is attempting to discredit and replace.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 625-646
Launched on MUSE
2005-08-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.