Abstract

This paper takes up Shaftesbury's investment in authorship, arguing that it is, in large part, a reaction to the discourse of romance and the early novel in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. My argument is unique in addressing Shaftesbury's specifically gendered concern with the relationship between the authorial psyche and the social role of literary and philosophical texts. Departing from recent analyses that have tended to see Shaftesbury's Characteristicks (1711) as a generic precursor to the novel, I have examined Shaftesbury's role in shaping the emergence of an eighteenth-century literary theory; a theory that reads the novel as an intimately affective and highly sexualized form in need of rescue by masculine authority.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 605-621
Launched on MUSE
2005-07-08
Open Access
No
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