Abstract

On August 27 and 28, 1832, the Saint-Simonians were tried for outrage to public morals. I analyze the August trial and caricatures of the Ecole in the light of Carole Pateman's notion of the sexual contract, to argue that the Saint-Simonians' "outrage" lay in their challenge to the founding fiction of social order: the social contract. By proclaiming that the social individual is man and woman, and by positing that the social pact is predicated on a sexual contract, the Saint-Simonians questioned not only the structure of the public sphere during the Bourgeois Monarchy, but also its underlying ideology. (as)

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-0172
Print ISSN
0146-7891
Pages
pp. 258-272
Launched on MUSE
2005-06-28
Open Access
No
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