Abstract

This article takes up the story of the female subject abandoned by Habermas in a less than hospitable public sphere. Through an analysis of letters written by Geneviève Randon de Malboissière (1746-1766) and Marie-Jeanne (Manon) Phlipon (1754-1793), it reintroduces privateness into our discussion of what it means to become a modern female subject, while introducing notions of subjectivity, practice, and construction into our understanding of the relationship of women to the public sphere. I argue that letter-writing women became conscious of themselves as modern, gendered subjects in the gap between a common experience of privateness and the differential positions defined by gender in the public sphere.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 9-37
Launched on MUSE
2005-06-22
Open Access
No
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